Links To These Page Categories:

Jokes:

http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/forum/topics/laughing-to-get-the-endorphins

 

Brag Page For Our Pets:

http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/page/brag-page-for-pets#.UI11ZIZmMtE

 

Brag Page For Our 2 Legged Friends and Family:

http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/page/2-legged-brag-page

 

Dr Patty’s Questions Of The Week:

http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/forum/topic/search?q=questions+of+the+week

 

Recipes You Want To Share:

http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/forum/categories/recipes-and-health/listForCategory#.UGyKb7UnVjc

 

Chronic Pain Poetry:

http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/page/chronic-pain-poetry

 

Chronic Pain Art:

http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/page/chronic-pain-art

 

Thoughts Or Inspirations Of The Day:

http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/page/thoughts-of-the-day#.UI11z4ZmMtE

Fun Things To Do On CIPAY’s Main Site

Fun Things On CIPAY – Chronic-Intractable Pain And You, Inc. (Main Site)


Fun Things On CIPAY – Chronic-Intractable Pain And You, Inc. (Main Site)

Jokes:
http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/forum/topics/laughing-to-get-the-endorphins

Brag Page For Our Pets:
http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/page/brag-page-for-pets#.UI11ZIZmMtE

Brag Page For Our 2 Legged Friends and Family:
http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/page/2-legged-brag-page

Dr Patty’s Questions Of The Week:
http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/forum/topic/search?q=questions+of+the+week

Recipes You Want To Share:
http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/forum/categories/recipes-and-health/listForCategory#.UGyKb7UnVjc

Chronic Pain Poetry:
http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/page/chronic-pain-poetry

Chronic Pain Art:
http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/page/chronic-pain-art

Thoughts Or Inspirations Of The Day:
http://www.chronicintractablepainandyou.org/page/thoughts-of-the-day#.UI11z4ZmMtE

Urgent Action Requested With Regards To Opiates and Chronic Pain And The Prescribing Of Pain Medications


Urgent Action Requested With Regards To Opiates and Chronic Pain And The Prescribing Of Pain Medications

Please send this to everyone you know!! The FDA is trying to make and end run around the laws of prescribing for pain sufferers!!

The Chronic-Intractable Pain and You Site(s) is joining with the RSDSA and would like to make you aware of a petition currently before the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that requests labeling changes for opioid analgesics (narcotic pain medications). Since many individuals with chronic and/or intractable pain rely on opioids as part of their medication regimen, we wanted to bring this petition to your attention.

The petition, submitted by Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing (PROP), requests three specific changes to opioid analgesic labels:

1- That they no longer be prescribed for “moderate” noncancer pain, but only for “severe” noncancer pain

2- That the maximum allowable dosage per day be equivalent to 100 mg of morphine for noncancer pain

3- That this medication can only be used for a maximum duration of 90 DAYS.

What this petition appears to mandate is a “one size fits all” prescribing mentality which DOES NOT benefit the chronic and/or intractable pain patients.

The RSDSA has chosen to oppose the PROP petition on behalf of you, our members. On Wednesday, October 10th, The RSDSA sent this opposition letter to the FDA. Cick Here to read RSDSA letter .

For those of you who would like to send your own individual response regarding PROP to the FDA, we encourage you to stress the specific details that your medication enables you to do that without it you would be unable to do. We suggest you use the following language to keep the message clear:

My name is _______. As a person who suffers with the chronic and yet incurable pain of ______(Your pain disoder), I ask the FDA to deny the PROP petition. I use opioids as prescribed by my physician allowing me to function better and partake in life in ways I would be unable to do without this prescribed care.

To send your comments to the FDA click here. The category to use for your response is Individual Consumer.

Your immediate action to this issue will make a difference. To read the PROP petition,

click here.

Please forward this email along to your friends and loved ones.

Should you have any questions

Please forward this email along to your friends and loved ones.

Should you have any questions or would like to receive further information, please email me.

Dr Patty Hagler-Verdugo, PsyD

Creator/Chair of Chronic-Intractable Pain And You Site(s) drpattyverdugo@chronicintractablepainandyou.org

You and your partner can have a satisfying sexual relationship in spite of your chronic pain. – Chronic-Intractable Pain And You, Inc. (Main Site)


You and your partner can have a satisfying sexual relationship in spite of your chronic pain. – Chronic-Intractable Pain And You, Inc. (Main Site)

You and your partner can have a satisfying sexual relationship in spite of your chronic pain.

By Mayo Clinic staff
People need physical and emotional intimacy almost as much as they need food and shelter. Sexuality helps fulfill the vital need for human connection. It’s a natural and healthy part of living, as well as an important aspect of your identity as a person. But when chronic pain invades your life, the pleasures of sexuality often disappear. Here’s help on how to reconnect with your sexuality in spite of the chronic pain.

Talk to your doctor

Sometimes pain is the direct cause of sexual problems. You may simply hurt too much for sex. Adjusting your pain medication may be the solution. If your pain is so severe that sex seems out of the question, talk to your doctor. You may need to adjust the timing of your medication or create a different or stronger pain control plan.
On the flip side, certain medications may cause sexual problems. Some medicines diminish sex drive (libido) or inhibit sexual function by causing changes in your nervous system. Drugs may also affect blood flow and hormones — two important factors in sexual response. Tell your doctor about any medication side effects that seem to be affecting your sexuality. Your doctor may be able to recommend an alternative medication or adjust the dose of your current medication.

Examine your emotions

To have good sex, you need to feel good about yourself. So start by examining your own emotions. If pain has left you physically scarred, unemployed or unable to contribute to housework, your self-esteem could be so battered that you feel you are unattractive and undesirable to your partner. Awareness that your physical and emotional distance is hurting your partner may add to your anxiety, fear, guilt and resentment.
Stress can also exacerbate underlying difficulties in your relationship. Even strong relationships can be challenged by medical problems or chronic pain. Being aware of emotional conflict and what’s causing it is an important first step in strengthening your relationship with your partner. Counseling may help.

Talk to your partner

The next step in reclaiming your sexuality is to talk with your partner about your feelings. At first, this may be best accomplished by talking to each other fully clothed, at the kitchen table or in another neutral setting. Sex can be difficult to talk about. Begin your sentences with, “I,” not with “you.” For example, “I feel loved and cared about when you hold me close,” is more likely to invite dialogue than, “You never touch me anymore.”
This is the time for both of you to talk about your fears and desires. You may think that your partner has stopped touching you because he or she has lost interest, or finds you undesirable. Instead, your partner may be fearful of causing you more physical pain.

Rekindling the spark

Spend time just getting to know each other again. Each of you might do little things that will make the other feel loved. Restoring your emotional intimacy will make it easier to move to the next step — physical intimacy.
Start reconnecting physically with an exploration of each other’s bodies that avoids the genitals entirely (sensate focusing). The goal is not orgasm. Instead, you’re learning more about what feels good to you and to your partner.

Be creative

Sexual intercourse is just one way to satisfy your need for human closeness. Intimacy can be expressed in many different ways.

  • Touch. Exploring your partner’s body through touch is an exciting way to express your sexual feelings. This can include holding hands, cuddling, fondling, stroking, massaging and kissing. Touch in any form increases feelings of intimacy.
  • Self-stimulation. Masturbation is a normal and healthy way to fulfill your sexual needs. One partner may use masturbation during mutual sexual activity if the other partner is unable to be very active.
  • Oral sex. It can be an alternative or supplement to traditional intercourse.
  • Different positions. Lie side by side, kneel or sit. Look in your library or bookstore for a guide that describes and illustrates different ways to have intercourse. If you’re embarrassed to get this kind of book locally, try an online book retailer.
  • Vibrators and lubricants. A vibrator can add pleasure without physical exertion. If lack of natural lubrication is a problem, over-the-counter lubricants can prevent pain associated with vaginal dryness.

Plan ahead

Intimacy can be more satisfying if you plan for it in advance. Make a date with your partner, picking a time of day when you have the most energy and the least pain.
Take your pain medication well in advance so that its effectiveness will peak when you need it. Limit the amount of alcohol you drink and avoid using tobacco in any form. Alcohol and tobacco can impair sexual function.
Give yourself plenty of time to try new things. Try to stay relaxed and keep your sense of humor. Focus on the journey, not the destination. If you encounter setbacks, try not to become discouraged or focus on the negative — keep trying.

Worth the effort

Intimacy can actually make you feel better. The body’s natural painkillers, called endorphins, are released during touch and sex. And the closeness you feel during lovemaking can help you feel stronger and better able to cope with your chronic pain.

References

  1. Sexuality for the man with cancer. American Cancer Society. http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/cid/documents/webcontent/002910-pdf.pdf. Accessed Oct. 5, 2010.
  2. Basson R, et al. Sexual sequelae of general medical disorders. Lancet. 2007;369:409.
  3. Gevirtz C. How chronic pain affects sexuality. Nursing. 2008;38:17.
  4. Paice J. Sexuality and chronic pain. American Journal of Nursing. 2003;103:87.
  5. Sex and arthritis. American College of Rheumatology. http://www.rheumatology.org/practice/clinical/patients/diseases_and_conditions/sexandarthritis.pdf. Accessed Oct. 5, 2010.
  6. Sexuality and reproductive issues (PDQ). National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/supportivecare/sexuality/healthprofessional/allpages/print. Accessed Oct. 5, 2010.
  7. Wilmoth MC. Sexuality: A critical component of quality of life in chronic disease. Nursing Clinics of North America. 2007;42:507.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/chronic-pain/PN00009